Bett 2015 Review: School Technology is Growing Up?

I’ve been going to the BETT show as a Headteacher for 7 years now. Each year there’s been a different focus and reason to go, as well as different themes that seem to run across the show as the technology and research develops.  I wrote before this year’s show about the lure of the ‘shiny things’ on offer there and my aim to look for the learning beyond the technology.

To start with (about 2008 for me) it was very much about learning platforms and websites; then mobile devices took hold and we all went looking at iPads or alternatives and apps and storage solutions etc.  There’s always the presence of online resources which are  updated depending on curriculum changes and a walk around the ‘fringe’ stands is always worthwhile to look at the new ideas from startups and smaller companies.  It’s worth planning what you are looking for, but plans can often go out of the window; two years ago, I went there looking for different laptops and notebooks for school and came back inspired by the different furniture on offer which led to us refitting classrooms in the school with ISIS concepts.

One question I often consider is whether I actually need to go down to London to update my thinking and knowledge of the market.  Couldn’t I just stay at home for a couple of days and research the world of ‘Ed-tech’ without the travel, expense and unfiltered noise that a trade show creates?  Looking back, this was may have been possible some years but the networking opportunities wouldn’t have been there and neither would there have been the chances to listen to some of the real stories from classrooms and schools across the UK which are always enlightening and sometimes inspiring.

2015 was really worthwhile and I found lots of inspiration both in and around the show from colleagues, speakers and technology.  The biggest shift in my thinking was around the role that ‘gamification‘ can play within schools; this was brought to my attention in Anthony Salcito’s keynote on Day 1 and I’m still pulling together my thoughts on this for a future post and thinking about the way we might explore the possibilities around gamification further in school.

Lots of people I met shrugged their shoulders and said, ‘there’s nothing new this year’.  I feel that this was a reflection on how the technology is now maturing, meaning that there are more conversations about teaching, learning and impact, and less excitement and prophetic talk of how holographic projectors or robots might transform the classroom.  As someone who is trying to see past the shiny things in order to get teachers to take small and sustainable steps forward with their use of technology in the classroom, this is helpful.

Is ‘Ed-Tech’ moving out of its troublesome teenage years that were so full of bold and brash decisions, false promises and expensive lessons learned, and into a more sensible (possibly less fun) adult existence where effectiveness, value for money and future-proofing are the way of life? Possibly.

Spending most of the week on and around the Microsoft stand, it certainly felt like the technology is growing up. Tools such as OneNote and Yammer now allow teachers and classes to easily achieve what many of us have laboured painfully towards in terms of student collaboration and online engagement in the past. The reality of Office 365’s long-anticipated potential has certainly arrived which finally allows schools to get into the cloud in an inexpensive, straightforward, safe and effective way.  For me, O365 has now graduated from ‘possibility’ to ‘no brainer’, offering schools free storage, email and online Microsoft tools which are accessible across all devices.  Wymondham High’s story is a great example and case study to follow.

A final word and thanks to the Microsoft team who hosted myself and other staff from the UK showcase schools on the stand. It was great to share our journey at Simon de Senlis so far with other educators and a real privilege to hear the inspirational stories of others including Kevin Sait and Harry Traynor of Wyndonham High, Emma Hicks, Ray Chambers and Anthony Lees. All of these folk are well worth a follow to see the work that they are doing around technology back in their schools.

 

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